Primary care detection of cognitive impairment leveraging health and consumer technologies in underserved US communities: protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial of the MyCog paradigm

Rebecca Lovett*, Morgan Bonham, Julia Yoshino Benavente, Zahra Hosseinian, Greg J. Byrne, Maria Varela Diaz, Michael Bass, Lihua Yao, Andrei Adin-Cristian, Stephanie Batio, Minjee Kim, Amanda Sluis, Margaret Moran, David R. Buchanan, Justin Hunt, Stephanie R. Young, Richard Gershon, Cindy Nowinski, Michael Wolf

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction Early identification of cognitive impairment (CI), including Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD), is a top public health priority. Yet, CI/ADRD is often undetected and underdiagnosed within primary care settings, and in health disparate populations. The MyCog paradigm is an iPad-based, self-administered, validated cognitive assessment based on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Toolbox Cognition Battery and coupled with clinician decision-support tools that is specifically tailored for CI/ADRD detection within diverse, primary care settings. Methods and analysis We will conduct a two-arm, primary care practice-randomised (N=24 practices; 45 257 active patients at the proposed practices), pragmatic trial among geographically diverse Oak Street Health sites to test the effectiveness of the MyCog paradigm to improve early detection CI/ADRD among low socioeconomic, black and Hispanic older adults compared with usual care. Participating practices randomised to the intervention arm will impart the MyCog paradigm as a new standard of care over a 3-year implementation period; as the cognitive component for Annual Wellness Visits and for any patient/informant-reported or healthcare provider-suspected cognitive concern. Rates of detected (cognitive test suggesting impairment) and/or diagnosed (relevant International Classification of Diseases-9/10 [ICD-9/10] code) cognitive deficits, impairments or dementias including ADRD will be our primary outcome of study compared between arms. Secondary outcomes will include ADRD severity (ie, mild or later stage), rates of cognitive-related referrals and rates of family member or caregiver involvement in ADRD care planning. We will use generalised linear mixed models to account for clustered study design. Secondary models will adjust for subject, clinic or visit-specific characteristics. We will use mixed-methods approaches to examine fidelity and cost-effectiveness of the MyCog paradigm. Ethics and dissemination The Institutional Review Board at Advarra has approved the study protocol (Pro00064339). Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and summaries will be provided to the funders of the study. Trial registration number NCT05607732.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere080101
JournalBMJ open
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 18 2023

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Clinical Trial
  • Dementia
  • Electronic Health Records
  • GENERAL MEDICINE (see Internal Medicine)
  • Primary Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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