Professional quality of life of veterans affairs staff and providers in a patient-centered care environment

Sara M. Locatelli*, Sherri L LaVela

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Changes to the work environment prompted by the movement toward patient-centered care have the potential to improve occupational stress among health care workers by improving team-based work activities, collaboration, and employee-driven quality improvement. This study was conducted to examine professional quality of life among providers at patient-centered care pilot facilities. Surveys were conducted with 76 Veterans Affairs employees/providers at facilities piloting patient-centered care interventions, to assess demographics, workplace practices and views (team-based environment, employee voice, quality of communication, and turnover intention), and professional quality of life (compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress). Professional quality-of-life subscales were not related to employee position type, age, or gender. Employee voice measures were related to lower burnout and higher compassion satisfaction. In addition, employees who were considering leaving their position showed higher burnout and lower compassion satisfaction scores. None of the work practices showed relationships with secondary traumatic stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-254
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Care Manager
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Keywords

  • burnout
  • health personnel
  • patient-centered care
  • personnel turnover
  • professional
  • quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Professional quality of life of veterans affairs staff and providers in a patient-centered care environment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this