Prognostic implications of myocardial contractile reserve in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction

Farooq A. Chaudhry*, Jason T. Tauke, Renato S. Alessandrini, Gil Vardi, Michele A. Parker, Robert O. Bonow

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

139 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study was performed to assess the prognostic implications of myocardial contractile reserve (MCR) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. BACKGROUND: MCR during dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) identifies viable myocardium that may improve in function after revascularization. Whether revascularization influences prognosis of patients with MCR has not been determined. METHODS: We performed DSE in 80 patients with CAD and LV dysfunction (ejection fraction ≤40%). Viable myocardium was defined in dysfunctional myocardial segments as enhanced thickening and contraction during low-dose dobutamine (5 to 10 mcg/kg/min). Serial prospective follow-up was obtained in all patients (mean follow-up 2.2 ± 1.1 years). RESULTS: Among 52 patients treated medically, there were 20 cardiac deaths. By multivariate analysis, the number of dysfunctional segments demonstrating MCR was the strongest predictor of survival (p < 0.03). Patients with MCR had better initial survival during medical therapy than did those without MCR, but this survival advantage was not maintained beyond three years. In contrast, survival was excellent in patients with MCR who underwent myocardial revascularization. Among 58 patients with MCR in ≥5 myocardial segments, survival at three years was 93 ± 6% in the 24 patients who were revascularized but only 49 ± 15% in the 34 treated medically (p < 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Myocardial contractile reserve is a significant predictor of survival in patients with CAD and LV dysfunction undergoing medical therapy. Although patients with MCR have an initial survival advantage, this advantage is lost over the course of three years. In contrast, survival in patients with significant MCR is enhanced by revascularization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)730-738
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Prognostic implications of myocardial contractile reserve in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this