Prognostic Value of Left Ventricular End-Systolic Volume Index as a Predictor of Heart Failure Hospitalization in Stable Coronary Artery Disease: Data from the Heart and Soul Study

David D. McManus, Sanjiv J. Shah, Mary Rose Fabi, Alisa Rosen, Mary A. Whooley, Nelson B. Schiller*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

57 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Left ventricular (LV) end-systolic volume indexed to body surface area (ESVI) is a simple yet powerful echocardiographic marker of LV remodeling that can be measured easily. The prognostic value of ESVI and its merit relative to other markers of LV remodeling in patients with coronary heart disease are unknown. Methods: We examined the association of ESVI with hospitalization for heart failure (HF) and mortality in a prospective study of patients with coronary heart disease. Results: Of the 989 participants, 110 (11%) were hospitalized for HF during 3.6 ± 1.1 years of follow-up. Among participants in the highest ESVI quartile (>25 mL/m2), 67 of 248 (27%) developed HF compared with 8 of 248 (3%) among those in the lowest quartile. The association between ESVI and HF hospitalization persisted after adjustment for potential confounders (hazard ratio 5.0, 95% confidence interval, 1.5-16.9; P = .01). Conclusion: ESVI >25 mL/m2 is an independent predictor of hospitalization for HF in patients with stable coronary heart disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)190-197
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Society of Echocardiography
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009

Keywords

  • Coronary artery disease
  • End-systolic volume index
  • Heart failure hospitalization
  • Left ventricular remodeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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