Programming and informal science learning: Making tuis work for museums

Michael S. Horn, Erin Treacy Solovey, Robert J K Jacob

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

in this paper we describe the design and initial evaluation of a tangible computer programming exhibit for children on display at the Boston Museum of Science. We also discuss five design considerations for tangible interfaces in science museums that guided our development and evaluation. in doing so, we propose the notion of passive tangible interfaces. Passive tangibles serve as a way to address practical issues involving tangible interaction in public settings and as a design strategy to promote reflective thinking. Results from our evaluation indicate that passive tangibles can preserve many of the benefits of tangible interaction for informal science learning while remaining cost-effective and reliable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 7th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2008
Pages194-201
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Event7th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2008 - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: Jun 11 2008Jun 13 2008

Other

Other7th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2008
CountryUnited States
CityChicago, IL
Period6/11/086/13/08

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Education

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