Progress toward improving medical school graduates' skills via a "boot camp" curriculum

Diane B. Wayne*, Elaine R. Cohen, Benjamin D. Singer, Farzad Moazed, Jeffrey H. Barsuk, Elizabeth Allison Lyons, John Butter, William C. McGaghie

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Medical school graduates are expected to possess a broad array of clinical skills. However, concerns have been raised regarding the preparation of medical students to enter graduate medical education. We designed a simulation-based "boot camp" experience for students entering internal medicine residency and compared medical student performance with the performance of historical controls who did not complete boot camp. METHODS: This was a cohort study of a simulation-based boot camp educational intervention. Twenty medical students completed 2 days (16 hours) of small group simulation-based education and individualized feedback and skills assessment. Skills included (a) physical examination techniques (cardiac auscultation); technical procedures including (b) paracentesis and (c) lumbar puncture; (d) recognition and management of patients with life-threatening conditions (intensive care unit clinical skills/mechanical ventilation); and (e) communication with patients and families (code status discussion). Student posttest scores were compared with baseline scores of postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) historical controls to assess the effectiveness of the intervention. RESULTS: Boot camp-trained medical students performed significantly better than PGY-1 historical controls on each simulated skill (P < 0.01). Results remained significant after controlling for age, sex, and US Medical Licensing Examination step 1 and 2 scores (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: A 2-day simulation-based boot camp for graduating medical students boosted a variety of clinical skills to levels significantly higher than PGY-1 historical controls. Simulation-based education shows promise to help ensure that medical school graduates are prepared to begin postgraduate training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-39
Number of pages7
JournalSimulation in Healthcare
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

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school graduate
Medical Schools
Medical Students
Curriculum
Curricula
medical student
Clinical Competence
Students
curriculum
simulation
Simulation
Heart Auscultation
Paracentesis
Graduate Medical Education
Education
education
examination
Spinal Puncture
Medical Education
Licensure

Keywords

  • Boot camp
  • Clinical skill assessment
  • Simulation-based education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Education
  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

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Progress toward improving medical school graduates' skills via a "boot camp" curriculum. / Wayne, Diane B.; Cohen, Elaine R.; Singer, Benjamin D.; Moazed, Farzad; Barsuk, Jeffrey H.; Lyons, Elizabeth Allison; Butter, John; McGaghie, William C.

In: Simulation in Healthcare, Vol. 9, No. 1, 01.02.2014, p. 33-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lyons, Elizabeth Allison

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