Project QUIT (Quit Using Drugs Intervention Trial): A randomized controlled trial of a primary care-based multi-component brief intervention to reduce risky drug use

Lillian Gelberg*, Ronald M. Andersen, Abdelmonem A. Afifi, Barbara D. Leake, Lisa Arangua, Mani Vahidi, Kyle Singleton, Julia Yacenda-Murphy, Steve Shoptaw, Michael F. Fleming, Sebastian E. Baumeister

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims: To assess the effect of a multi-component primary care delivered brief intervention for reducing risky psychoactive drug use (RDU) among patients identified by screening. Design: Multicenter single-blind two-arm randomized controlled trial of patients enrolled from February 2011 to November 2012 with 3-month follow-up. Randomization and allocation to trial group were computer-generated. Setting: Primary care waiting rooms of five federally qualified health centers in Los Angeles County (LAC), USA. Participants: A total of 334 adult primary care patients (171 intervention; 163 control) with RDU scores (4-26) on the World Health Organization (WHO) Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) self-administered on tablet computers. 261 (78%) completed follow-up. Mean age was 41.7years; 62.9% were male; 37.7% were Caucasian. Intervention(s) and Measurement: Intervention patients received brief (typically 3-4 minutes) clinician advice to quit/reduce their drug use reinforced by a video doctor message, health education booklet and up to two 20-30-minute follow-up telephone drug use coaching sessions. Controls received usual care and cancer screening information. Primary outcome was patient self-reported use of highest scoring drug (HSD) at follow-up. Findings: Intervention and control patients reported equivalent baseline HSD use at 3-month follow-up. After adjustment for covariates, in the complete sample linear regression model, intervention patients used their HSD on 3.5 fewer days in the previous month relative to controls (P<0.001), and in the completed sample model, intervention patients used their HSD 2.2 fewer days than controls (P<0.005). No compensatory increases in use of other measured substances were found. Conclusions: A primary-care based, clinician-delivered brief intervention with follow-up coaching calls may decrease risky psychoactive drug use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1777-1790
Number of pages14
JournalAddiction
Volume110
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2015

Keywords

  • Brief intervention
  • Community health centers
  • Motivational interviewing
  • Primary care
  • Randomized controlled trial
  • Risky drug use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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