Promoting physical activity in young adult cancer survivors using mHealth and adaptive tailored feedback strategies: Design of the Improving Physical Activity after Cancer Treatment (IMPACT) randomized controlled trial

Carmina G. Valle*, Bernardine M. Pinto, Jessica Gokee LaRose, Molly Diamond, Lindsey N. Horrell, Brooke T. Nezami, Karen E. Hatley, Erin M. Coffman, Kristen Polzien, Derek P. Hales, Allison M. Deal, Christine M. Rini, Donald L. Rosenstein, Deborah F. Tate

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Despite the health benefits of physical activity for cancer survivors, nearly 60% of young adult cancer survivors (YACS) are physically inactive. Few physical activity interventions have been designed specifically for YACS. Purpose: To describe the rationale and design of the IMPACT (IMproving Physical Activity after Cancer Treatment) trial, which tests the efficacy of a theory-based, mobile physical activity intervention for YACS. Methods: A total of 280 physically inactive YACS (diagnosed at ages 18–39) will be randomized to a self-help control or intervention condition. All participants will receive an activity tracker and companion mobile app, cellular-enabled scale, individual videochat session, and access to a Facebook group. Intervention participants will also receive a 6-month mobile intervention based on social cognitive theory, which targets improvements in behavioral capability, self-regulation, self-efficacy, and social support, and incorporates self-regulation strategies and behavior change techniques. The program includes: behavioral lessons; adaptive goal-setting in response to individuals' changing activity patterns; tailored feedback based on objective data and self-report measures; tailored text messages; and Facebook prompts encouraging peer support. Assessments occur at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. The primary outcome is total physical activity min/week at 6 months (assessed via accelerometry); secondary outcomes include total physical activity at 12 months, sedentary behavior, weight, and psychosocial measures. Conclusions: IMPACT uniquely focuses on physical activity in YACS using an automated tailored mHealth program. Study findings could result in a high-reach, physical activity intervention for YACS that has potential to be adopted on a larger scale and reduce cancer-related morbidity. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03569605.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106293
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials
Volume103
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • Adaptive interventions
  • Physical activity
  • Social media
  • Tailored feedback
  • Technology
  • Young adult cancer survivors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Promoting physical activity in young adult cancer survivors using mHealth and adaptive tailored feedback strategies: Design of the Improving Physical Activity after Cancer Treatment (IMPACT) randomized controlled trial'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this