Provider and patient intervention to improve weight loss: A pilot study in a public hospital clinic

Terry C. Davis*, Michael S. Wolf, Pat F. Bass, Connie L. Arnold, Jian Huang, Estela M. Kennen, Mary V. Bocchini, Joan Blondin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To assess the efficacy of a literacy-appropriate weight loss intervention targeting providers and patients in improving physicians' weight loss counseling and patients' self-reported beliefs, and self-efficacy. Methods: The study took place in a public hospital nephrology clinic. The intervention included two physician workshops and a small group patient education. Physician-patient communication was observed and coded. Structured interviews assessed patient recall of weight loss recommendations, weight-related beliefs, and self-efficacy. Results: 64 patient visits were observed before and after the intervention. 75% of patients were African American, 96% lacked private insurance, 71% had low literacy skills; mean body mass index (BMI) of 35 kg/m2. Physician counseling improved significantly post-intervention, particularly in assessing, supporting and advising patients about weight loss and exercise. Patients reported increases in recall of weight loss recommendations and were more likely to report greater confidence about losing weight (52% vs. 70%, p < 0.01). Conclusions: This pilot study offers promising directions to address provider and patient barriers to weight loss education and counseling in a public hospital. Practice implications: Hospital-based weight loss interventions need to target both physicians and patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-62
Number of pages7
JournalPatient education and counseling
Volume72
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2008

Keywords

  • Health communication
  • Health literacy
  • Obesity
  • Patient education
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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