Psychological and behavioural effects of interferons

Stefania Bonaccorso, Herbert Meltzer, Michael Maes*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Immunotherapy with interferons may induce neuropsychiatric symptoms and disorders. Interferon-α-based immunotherapy is used to treat patients with chronic hepatitis C and metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Immunotherapy with interferon-α induces symptoms such as slowness, severe fatigue, hypersomnia, lethargy, depressed mood, mnemonic troubles, irritability, short temper, emotional lability, social withdrawal, lack of concentration and full blown major depression in a considerable number of patients treated. The exact mechanism whereby interferon-α induces depression has remained elusive. However, there is now some evidence that interferon-α-based immunotherapy induces the cytokine network, decreases the serotonergic turnover in the brain, and induces the catabolism of tryptophan. There is evidence that interferon-α immunotherapy-induced depression is related to an increased catabolism of tryptophan into kynurenine. (C) 2000 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)673-677
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent opinion in psychiatry
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 25 2000

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Interferons
Immunotherapy
Psychology
Depression
Tryptophan
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence
Kynurenine
Lethargy
Chronic Hepatitis C
Renal Cell Carcinoma
Fatigue
Cytokines
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Bonaccorso, Stefania ; Meltzer, Herbert ; Maes, Michael. / Psychological and behavioural effects of interferons. In: Current opinion in psychiatry. 2000 ; Vol. 13, No. 6. pp. 673-677.
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Psychological and behavioural effects of interferons. / Bonaccorso, Stefania; Meltzer, Herbert; Maes, Michael.

In: Current opinion in psychiatry, Vol. 13, No. 6, 25.11.2000, p. 673-677.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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