Psychosocial and Neighborhood Correlates of Health- Related Quality of Life

A Multi-Level Study Among Hispanic Adults

Sarah D. Mills*, Rina Sobel Fox, Sandy Bohan, Scott C. Roesch, Georgia Robins Sadler, Vanessa L. Malcarne

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Improvement in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is a public health goal of Healthy People 2020. Hispanics living in the United States are at risk for poor HRQoL, but the causes and correlates of this risk are not well understood. Thus, the present study examined individual-level psychosocial and neighborhood-level built environment correlates of physical and mental HRQoL among Hispanic adults. Method: A community sample of Hispanic adults (N = 383) completed self-report health-related questionnaires, and census tract was used to collect data on neighborhood-level built environment variables. Multilevel modeling was used to examine individual-level psychosocial (language preference, religiosity, subjective social status, discrimination, and number of years lived in the United States) and neighborhood-level built-environment (the retail food environment, proximity to alcohol retailers, and tobacco retailer density) correlates of physical and mental HRQoL. Results: Higher subjective social status was significantly associated with better HRQoL, and more experiences with discrimination were significantly associated with lower HRQoL. For physical HRQoL, these relationships were stronger in neighborhoods with a higher density of tobacco retail outlets. Conclusions: Findings from this study suggest that subjective social status and discrimination play important roles in HRQoL among Hispanics, in particular in neighborhoods with a higher density of tobacco retail outlets. This study highlights the importance of considering neighborhood context, and in particular neighborhood disadvantage, when examining the relationship between social status, discrimination and HRQoL among Hispanics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
quality of life
Quality of Life
health
social status
nicotine
Tobacco
discrimination
Mental Health
mental health
social discrimination
health report
Life Change Events
Censuses
role play
Self Report
census
Language
Public Health
public health

Keywords

  • Built environment
  • Health-related quality of life
  • Hispanics
  • Social ecological model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

@article{46dfdd185b494496af57cebca051dc7b,
title = "Psychosocial and Neighborhood Correlates of Health- Related Quality of Life: A Multi-Level Study Among Hispanic Adults",
abstract = "Objective: Improvement in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is a public health goal of Healthy People 2020. Hispanics living in the United States are at risk for poor HRQoL, but the causes and correlates of this risk are not well understood. Thus, the present study examined individual-level psychosocial and neighborhood-level built environment correlates of physical and mental HRQoL among Hispanic adults. Method: A community sample of Hispanic adults (N = 383) completed self-report health-related questionnaires, and census tract was used to collect data on neighborhood-level built environment variables. Multilevel modeling was used to examine individual-level psychosocial (language preference, religiosity, subjective social status, discrimination, and number of years lived in the United States) and neighborhood-level built-environment (the retail food environment, proximity to alcohol retailers, and tobacco retailer density) correlates of physical and mental HRQoL. Results: Higher subjective social status was significantly associated with better HRQoL, and more experiences with discrimination were significantly associated with lower HRQoL. For physical HRQoL, these relationships were stronger in neighborhoods with a higher density of tobacco retail outlets. Conclusions: Findings from this study suggest that subjective social status and discrimination play important roles in HRQoL among Hispanics, in particular in neighborhoods with a higher density of tobacco retail outlets. This study highlights the importance of considering neighborhood context, and in particular neighborhood disadvantage, when examining the relationship between social status, discrimination and HRQoL among Hispanics.",
keywords = "Built environment, Health-related quality of life, Hispanics, Social ecological model",
author = "Mills, {Sarah D.} and Fox, {Rina Sobel} and Sandy Bohan and Roesch, {Scott C.} and Sadler, {Georgia Robins} and Malcarne, {Vanessa L.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
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doi = "10.1037/cdp0000274",
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Psychosocial and Neighborhood Correlates of Health- Related Quality of Life : A Multi-Level Study Among Hispanic Adults. / Mills, Sarah D.; Fox, Rina Sobel; Bohan, Sandy; Roesch, Scott C.; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Malcarne, Vanessa L.

In: Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Psychosocial and Neighborhood Correlates of Health- Related Quality of Life

T2 - A Multi-Level Study Among Hispanic Adults

AU - Mills, Sarah D.

AU - Fox, Rina Sobel

AU - Bohan, Sandy

AU - Roesch, Scott C.

AU - Sadler, Georgia Robins

AU - Malcarne, Vanessa L.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objective: Improvement in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is a public health goal of Healthy People 2020. Hispanics living in the United States are at risk for poor HRQoL, but the causes and correlates of this risk are not well understood. Thus, the present study examined individual-level psychosocial and neighborhood-level built environment correlates of physical and mental HRQoL among Hispanic adults. Method: A community sample of Hispanic adults (N = 383) completed self-report health-related questionnaires, and census tract was used to collect data on neighborhood-level built environment variables. Multilevel modeling was used to examine individual-level psychosocial (language preference, religiosity, subjective social status, discrimination, and number of years lived in the United States) and neighborhood-level built-environment (the retail food environment, proximity to alcohol retailers, and tobacco retailer density) correlates of physical and mental HRQoL. Results: Higher subjective social status was significantly associated with better HRQoL, and more experiences with discrimination were significantly associated with lower HRQoL. For physical HRQoL, these relationships were stronger in neighborhoods with a higher density of tobacco retail outlets. Conclusions: Findings from this study suggest that subjective social status and discrimination play important roles in HRQoL among Hispanics, in particular in neighborhoods with a higher density of tobacco retail outlets. This study highlights the importance of considering neighborhood context, and in particular neighborhood disadvantage, when examining the relationship between social status, discrimination and HRQoL among Hispanics.

AB - Objective: Improvement in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is a public health goal of Healthy People 2020. Hispanics living in the United States are at risk for poor HRQoL, but the causes and correlates of this risk are not well understood. Thus, the present study examined individual-level psychosocial and neighborhood-level built environment correlates of physical and mental HRQoL among Hispanic adults. Method: A community sample of Hispanic adults (N = 383) completed self-report health-related questionnaires, and census tract was used to collect data on neighborhood-level built environment variables. Multilevel modeling was used to examine individual-level psychosocial (language preference, religiosity, subjective social status, discrimination, and number of years lived in the United States) and neighborhood-level built-environment (the retail food environment, proximity to alcohol retailers, and tobacco retailer density) correlates of physical and mental HRQoL. Results: Higher subjective social status was significantly associated with better HRQoL, and more experiences with discrimination were significantly associated with lower HRQoL. For physical HRQoL, these relationships were stronger in neighborhoods with a higher density of tobacco retail outlets. Conclusions: Findings from this study suggest that subjective social status and discrimination play important roles in HRQoL among Hispanics, in particular in neighborhoods with a higher density of tobacco retail outlets. This study highlights the importance of considering neighborhood context, and in particular neighborhood disadvantage, when examining the relationship between social status, discrimination and HRQoL among Hispanics.

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KW - Hispanics

KW - Social ecological model

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