Pulmonary function in single lung transplantation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

L. A. Brunsting, F. M. Lupinetti, P. N. Cascade, F. S. Becker, B. D. Daly, F. J. Martinez, J. P. Lynch, R. I. Whyte, E. L. Bove, S. F. Bolling, M. B. Orringer, R. D. Florn, G. M. Deeb, F. L. Grover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

The primary determinants of pulmonary function after heart-lung or double lung transplantation are the volume and compliance of the recipient's thoracic cage. This study evaluated the influence of recipient chest wall factors on static and dynamic lung volumes after single lung transplantation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Fourteen patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease received 15 single lung transplants (one retransplant). Posttransplantation follow-up data at 3 and 6 months, in the absence of infection or rejection, were available in nine patients. Overall pulmonary function at 6 months improved from preoperative levels to 55 % to 65 % of predicted values (forced vital capacity 38% to 55%, forced expiratory volume at 1 second 18% to 55%, maximum voluntary ventilation 21 % to 65 %), and allograft-specific pulmonary function improved to nearly normal predicted single-lung values (forced vital capacity 89%, forced expiratory volume at 1 second 90%, maximum voluntary ventilation 105%). Postoperative pulmonary function in these patients correlated significantly, with preoperative thoracic volume measured by planimetry of chest radiographs. No correlation between postoperative pulmonary function was demonstrated with either the estimated volume of donated lung tissue or relative donor-to-recipient size matching. These findings support the concept that recipient chest wall factors determine postoperative pulmonary function in patients undergoing single lung transplantation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Furthermore, the allograft lung functions at a normal level for the recipient and does not appear to be constrained by hyperinflation of the contralateral lung.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1337-1345
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume107
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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