Pulse pressure-III. Prognostic significance in four Chicago epidemiologic studies

Alan R. Dyer*, Jeremiah Stamler, Richard B. Shekelle, James A. Schoenberger, Rose Stamler, Susan Shekelle, Patricia Collette, David M. Berkson, Oglesby Paul, Mark H. Lepper, Howard A. Lindberg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

This report, the third in a series on pulse pressure and pure systolic hypertension, examines the associations between blood pressure and the cardiovascular diseases and coronary heart disease, both cross-sectionally and prospectively, utilizing data from four Chicago epidemiologic studies, in an effort to determine whether or not a widened pulse pressure, or pure systolic hypertension, is an independent risk factor. In these analyses, blood pressure is divided into two components, one related to level and the other to pulse pressure, with pulse pressure redefined so that the association between pulse pressure and the prevalence of ECG abnormalities or mortality, indicates whether the endpoint is more strongly related to systolic or diastolic blood pressure. In these studies, blood pressure level is significantly related to both ECG abnormalities and mortality. In the cross-sectional analyses, pulse pressure is generally positively related to the prevalence of ECG abnormalities, indicating a stronger association for systolic blood pressure, and thus a possible association with pure systolic hypertension. However, in the prospective analyses, pulse pressure is generally not related to mortality, indicating an equal association with mortality for systolic and diastolic blood pressure in these studies. Thus, although the cross-sectional analyses generally support the hypothesis that a widened pulse pressure, or pure systolic hypertension, is an independent risk factor for the cardiovascular diseases and coronary heart disease, the prospective analyses do not.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-294
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of chronic diseases
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1982

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Pulse pressure-III. Prognostic significance in four Chicago epidemiologic studies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this