Quality of Care of and Outcomes for African Americans Hospitalized With Heart Failure. Findings From the OPTIMIZE-HF (Organized Program to Initiate Lifesaving Treatment in Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure) Registry

Clyde W. Yancy*, William T. Abraham, Nancy M. Albert, Robert Clare, Wendy Gattis Stough, Mihai Gheorghiade, Barry H. Greenberg, Christopher M. O'Connor, Lilin She, Jie Lena Sun, James B. Young, Gregg C. Fonarow

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

65 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: We sought to examine the characteristics, quality of care, and clinical outcomes for a large cohort of African-American patients hospitalized with heart failure (HF) in centers participating in a quality improvement initiative. Background: Heart failure in African Americans is characterized by variations in natural history, lesser response to evidence-based therapies, and disparate health care. We hypothesized that a performance improvement program will achieve similar adherence to quality measures in African Americans admitted with HF compared with non-African Americans. Methods: The OPTIMIZE-HF (Organized Program to Initiate Lifesaving Treatment in Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure) registry-based performance-improvement program includes a pre-specified 10% subgroup with 60- to 90-day follow-up. Data on quality of care measures and outcomes were analyzed for 8,608 African-American patients compared with 38,501 non-African-American patients. Results: African Americans were significantly younger and more likely to receive evidence-based medications but less likely to receive discharge instructions and smoking cessation counseling. In multivariable analyses, African-American race was an independent predictor of lower in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 0.71; 95% confidence interval 0.57 to 0.87; p < 0.001) but similar hospital length of stay. After multivariable adjustment, post-discharge outcomes were similar for American-American and non-African-American patients, but African-American race was associated with higher angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor prescription and left ventricular function assessment; no other HF quality indicators were influenced by race. Conclusions: In the context of a performance-improvement program, African Americans with HF received similar or better treatment with evidence-based medications, less discharge counseling, had better in-hospital survival, and similar adjusted risk of follow-up death/repeat hospital stay. (Organized Program to Initiate Lifesaving Treatment In Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure [OPTIMIZE-HF]; NCT00344513).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1675-1684
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume51
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 29 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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