Quality of life concerns and depression among hematopoietic stem cell transplant survivors

Catherine E. Mosher*, Katherine N. Duhamel, Christine Marie Rini, Geoffrey Corner, Joanne Lam, William H. Redd

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: This study examined quality of life, transplant-related concerns, and depressive symptoms and their demographic and medical correlates at 1 to 3 years following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods: HSCT survivors (N=406) completed telephone-administered questionnaires that assessed demographic variables, functional status, quality of life, transplant-related concerns, and depressive symptoms. Results: The most prevalent concerns among HSCT survivors included physical symptoms (e.g., fatigue and pain), maintaining current health status and employment, changes in appearance, and lack of sexual interest and satisfaction. In addition, almost one-third (32%) of survivors age 40 years and younger reported concern about their ability to have children. Unemployed survivors and those with lower incomes and worse functional status were more likely to experience poorer quality of life in multiple domains. Fifteen percent of the sample reported moderate to severe depressive symptoms, and these symptoms were higher among allogeneic transplant recipients and those with lower functional status. Conclusions: Results suggest that interventions are needed to address physical symptoms, coping with an uncertain future, infertility, and sexual issues during the early phase of HSCT survivorship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1357-1365
Number of pages9
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume19
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011

Keywords

  • Cancer survivorship
  • Depression
  • Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
  • Psychological
  • Quality of life
  • Sexual health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

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