Quantification of cotinine in dried blood spots as a biomarker of exposure to tobacco smoke

Daniel Ladror, Bruce Pitt, William Funk*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: We present an ultra-sensitive, minimally-invasive method for quantifying cotinine in dried blood spot (DBS) samples as a biomarker of exposure to tobacco smoke that can be collected using a simple heel or finger prick to obtain blood samples. Methods: Cotinine levels were measured in matched plasma and reconstituted DBS samples from smokers and nonsmokers to evaluate assay parameters. In addition, we applied this new method to finger-prick DBS samples that were collected from infants, children and young adults ages 1–21 to estimate exposure to tobacco smoke. Partitioning of cotinine across red blood cells and haematocrit effects were investigated. Results: Cotinine levels measured in matched plasma and reconstituted DBS samples from smokers and nonsmokers were found to be highly correlated (R2=0.94), with 100% sensitivity and 94% specificity to differentiate reported smokers from nonsmokers. With this method, the LOQ is <0.25 ng/mL using a single 3.2 mm punch of a DBS, and haematocrit effects are negligible. Conclusions: This sensitive, high-throughput and minimally-invasive method for quantifying cotinine in DBS samples provides a simple and cost effective means for estimating exposure to tobacco smoke in population based studies, and has particular advantages in studies involving infants and children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-50
Number of pages7
JournalBiomarkers
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2 2018

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Cotinine
  • biomarkers
  • dried blood spots
  • tandem mass spectrometry
  • tobacco smoke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this