Quantitative next-generation sequencing-based analysis indicates progressive accumulation of microsatellite instability between atypical hyperplasia/endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia and paired endometrioid endometrial carcinoma

David B. Chapel, Sushant A. Patil, Andrei Plagov, Rutika Puranik, Anastasiya Mendybaeva, George Steinhardt, Pankhuri Wanjari, Ricardo R. Lastra, Sabah Kadri, Jeremy P. Segal, Lauren L. Ritterhouse*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Atypical hyperplasia/endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia is an accepted precursor to endometrioid-type endometrial carcinoma. Mismatch repair-deficient endometrial carcinomas are also known to be a biologically and clinically distinct subset of tumors. However, the development of microsatellite instability in endometrial carcinogenesis has not yet been evaluated by novel next-generation sequencing-based methods. We examined 17 mismatch repair-deficient endometrioid endometrial carcinomas and their paired atypical hyperplasia/endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia precursors using a next-generation sequencing panel with quantitative microsatellite instability detection at 336 loci. Findings were compared to histological features, polymerase chain reaction-based microsatellite instability testing, immunohistochemical expression of mismatch repair proteins, and tumor mutational burden calculations. All 17 endometrial carcinomas and 8/17 atypical hyperplasia/endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia showed microsatellite instability by next-generation sequencing-based testing. Endometrial carcinoma specimens showed significantly more unstable microsatellite loci than paired atypical hyperplasia/endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (mean: 40.0% vs 19.9 unstable loci, respectively). Out of nine microsatellite-stable atypical hyperplasia/endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia specimens, four showed mismatch repair loss by immunohistochemistry. All atypical hyperplasia/endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia and endometrial carcinoma specimens with microsatellite instability were also mismatch repair-deficient by immunohistochemistry. Tumor mutational burden was significantly greater in endometrial carcinoma than in paired atypical hyperplasia/endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia specimens, and tumor mutational burden was significantly correlated with percent unstable microsatellite loci. Paired atypical hyperplasia/endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia and endometrial carcinoma specimens show progressive accumulation of unstable microsatellite loci following loss of mismatch repair protein expression. Comprehensive next-generation sequencing-based testing of endometrial carcinomas offers new insights into endometrial carcinogenesis and opportunities for improved tumor surveillance, diagnosis, and management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1508-1520
Number of pages13
JournalModern Pathology
Volume32
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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