Quantum-dot IR photodetectors get 'hotter'

Manijeh Razeghi*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

The improvements in the operating temperature and quantum efficiency of quantum-dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) have encouraged new imaging techniques that can be used in medical and biological imaging, environmental and chemical monitoring from space. Researchers are developing high-performance imagers using nanotechnology to form quantum dots, which can operate at room temperatures effectively. The QDIP device comprises 25 stacks of a hybrid structure of indium arsenide (InAs) quantum dots and an indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) quantum well, with aluminum indium arsenide (AlInAs) as a barrier. An atomic-force microscope and a scanning-electron microscope are used to measure the structural properties of the quantum dots, such as size and density, which enhance the capability of QDIPs significantly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages75-76
Number of pages2
Volume43
No12
Specialist publicationLaser Focus World
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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