Race-based coalitions among minority groups: Afro-Caribbean immigrants and African-Americans in New York City

Reuel R. Rogers*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

As immigration from Latin America, Asia, and the Caribbean increases the numbers of racial minorities living in American cities, political scientists are beginning to wonder whether these newcomers will forge coalitions with their native-born counterparts, particularly African-Americans. A number of scholars have argued that race-based alliances between non-White immigrants and African-Americans are likely, in light of continuing patterns of racial discrimination in this country. But it turns out that such coalitions are quite rare. Using the case of Caribbean-and American-born Blacks in New York City, the author attempts to understand why. He reconsiders the argument for race-based alliances, as well as other leading theories of intergroup coalition building. His analysis demonstrates why racial commonalities have not been enough to overcome interminority tensions, highlights the limits of race-based coalitions, and shows how institutions may shape the intergroup dynamics on which these attempted alliances fail or succeed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-317
Number of pages35
JournalUrban Affairs Review
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Keywords

  • African-Americans
  • Alliances
  • Caribbean immigrants
  • Coalitions
  • Ethnicity
  • Immigrants
  • New York City
  • Race
  • Racial minorities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Urban Studies

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Race-based coalitions among minority groups: Afro-Caribbean immigrants and African-Americans in New York City'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this