Racial differences in bother for women with urinary incontinence in the Establishing the Prevalence of Incontinence (EPI) study

Christina Lewicky-Gaupp*, Cynthia Brincat, Elisa R. Trowbridge, John O L DeLancey, Kenneth Guire, Divya A. Patel, Dee E. Fenner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare differences in degree of bother in black and white women with urinary incontinence (UI). Study Design: A population-based study was conducted in black and white women in Michigan. Participants completed an interview and the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire short form (IIQ-7). Statistical analysis included 2-way analysis of variance for post hoc comparisons of IIQ-7 scores between races at different frequencies, amounts, and types of UI. Results: Black women with moderate UI had significantly higher IIQ-7 scores than white women (31.4 ± 3.5 vs 23.7 ± 1.9; P = .03). Overall, black women with urge incontinence had higher scores than white women (30.5 ± 4.0 vs 21.0 ± 3.0; P = .05). After adjustment for severity, black women with urge and mixed incontinence tended to be more bothered (P = .06). Conclusion: With moderate UI (not mild or severe), black women are more bothered than white women. At this discriminatory level of UI severity, racial differences are important, because they may dictate care-seeking behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)510.e1-510.e6
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume201
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009

Keywords

  • bother
  • race
  • urinary incontinence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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