Racial/ethnic differences in self-reported and biologic measures of chronic stress in pregnancy

A. E.B. Borders*, K. Wolfe, S. Qadir, K. Y. Kim, J. Holl, W. Grobman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Racial differences in chronic maternal stress may contribute to disparities in pregnancy outcomes. The objective is to identify racial and ethnic differences in self-reported and biologic measures of stress between non-Hispanic black (NHB) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) pregnant women.Study Design:NHB and NHW pregnant women were enrolled before 23 weeks of gestation in this prospective cohort study. Equal numbers of women were recruited with public vs private insurance in each racial group. Self-reported stress was measured and blood samples collected in the second and third trimesters were analyzed for serum Epstein-Barr virus antibody, C-reactive protein (CRP), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and adenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH).Results:One hundred and twelve women were enrolled. NHW women reported more buffers against stress (P=0.04) and neighborhood satisfaction (P=0.02). NHB women reported more discrimination (P<0.001), food insecurity (P=0.04) and had significantly higher mean CRP levels and mean ACTH levels in the second and third trimesters.Conclusion:Significant differences in self-reported and biologic measures of chronic stress were identified between NHB and NHW pregnant women with similar economic characteristics. Future studies should investigate mechanisms underlying these differences and their relationship to pregnancy outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)580-584
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Perinatology
Volume35
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 30 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Racial/ethnic differences in self-reported and biologic measures of chronic stress in pregnancy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this