Raising happy children who succeed in school: Lessons from china and the united states

Eva M. Pomerantz*, Florrie Fei Yin Ng, Cecilia Sin Sze Cheung, Yang Qu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chinese children outperform their American counterparts in the academic arena. Although many aspects of Chinese and American children's environments likely contribute to this achievement gap, a key aspect may be learning-related parenting (e.g., assisting children with homework and responding to children's performance). In this article, we review differences in Chinese and American learning-related parenting, with attention to the trade-offs of each culture's style for children's academic and emotional functioning. We consider an integrated style of parenting combining the strengths of the Chinese and American styles to facilitate children's academic and emotional functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-76
Number of pages6
JournalChild Development Perspectives
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

Keywords

  • Achievement
  • China
  • Culture
  • Motivation
  • Parent involvement
  • Parenting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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