Random sub-diffusion and capture of genes by the nuclear pore reduces dynamics and coordinates inter- chromosomal movement

Michael Chas Sumner, Steven B. Torrisi, Donna G. Brickner, Jason H. Brickner*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Hundreds of genes interact with the yeast nuclear pore complex (NPC), localizing at the nuclear periphery and clustering with co-regulated genes. Dynamic tracking of peripheral genes shows that they cycle on and off the NPC and that interaction with the NPC slows their sub- diffusive movement. Furthermore, NPC-dependent inter-chromosomal clustering leads to coordinated movement of pairs of loci separated by hundreds of nanometers. We developed fractional Brownian motion simulations for chromosomal loci in the nucleoplasm and interacting with NPCs. These simulations predict the rate and nature of random sub-diffusion during repositioning from nucleoplasm to periphery and match measurements from two different experimental models, arguing that recruitment to the nuclear periphery is due to random sub- diffusion and transient capture by NPCs. Finally, the simulations do not lead to inter-chromosomal clustering or coordinated movement, suggesting that interaction with the NPC is necessary, but not sufficient, to cause clustering.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number66238
JournaleLife
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

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