Randomized clinical trial of telephone-administered cognitive-behavioral therapy to reduce post-traumatic stress disorder and distress symptoms after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation

Katherine N. DuHamel, Catherine E. Mosher, Gary Winkel, Larissa E. Labay, Christine Marie Rini, Yeraz Markarian Meschian, Jane Austin, Paul B. Greene, Catalina R. Lawsin, Anna Rusiewicz, Celia L. Grosskreutz, Luis Isola, Craig H. Moskowitz, Esperanza B. Papadopoulos, Scott Rowley, Eileen Scigliano, Jack E. Burkhalter, Karen E. Hurley, Andreas R. Bollinger, William H. Redd

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Abstract

Purpose: A significant number of survivors of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) report enduring adverse effects of treatment, including illness-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and general distress. We report results of a randomized clinical trial that tested the effects of a 10-session, telephone-administered cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention on PTSD, depression, and distress symptoms. Methods: Survivors who had undergone HSCT 1 to 3 years earlier (N = 408) were assessed for study eligibility. Those who met study eligibility criteria (n = 89) completed a baseline assessment that included a clinical interview and self-report measures of PTSD symptoms (the primary outcome) and depression and general distress (the secondary outcomes). Next, they were randomly assigned to CBT or an assessment-only condition. Survivors in the CBT group completed 10 individual telephone-based CBT sessions (T-CBT) that included strategies to reduce PTSD symptoms, depression, and general distress. Follow-up assessments occurred at 6, 9, and 12 months after the baseline assessment. Results: Linear mixed-model analyses revealed that, compared with HSCT survivors in the assessment-only condition, survivors who completed T-CBT reported fewer illness-related PTSD symptoms, including less avoidance (P < .001) and fewer intrusive thoughts (P < .05) as well as less general distress and fewer depressive symptoms (P < .05) even after controlling for potential demographic and medical covariates. These results were consistent across the three follow-up assessments. Conclusion: A brief, telephone-administered CBT intervention developed for HSCT survivors is an efficacious treatment for reducing illness-related PTSD symptoms and general distress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3754-3761
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume28
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 10 2010

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

DuHamel, K. N., Mosher, C. E., Winkel, G., Labay, L. E., Rini, C. M., Meschian, Y. M., Austin, J., Greene, P. B., Lawsin, C. R., Rusiewicz, A., Grosskreutz, C. L., Isola, L., Moskowitz, C. H., Papadopoulos, E. B., Rowley, S., Scigliano, E., Burkhalter, J. E., Hurley, K. E., Bollinger, A. R., & Redd, W. H. (2010). Randomized clinical trial of telephone-administered cognitive-behavioral therapy to reduce post-traumatic stress disorder and distress symptoms after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 28(23), 3754-3761. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2009.26.8722