Randomized controlled trial for behavioral smoking and weight control treatment: Effect of concurrent versus sequential intervention

Bonnie Spring*, Sherry Pagoto, Regina Pingitore, Neal Doran, Kristin Schneider, Don Hedeker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

91 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors compared simultaneous versus sequential approaches to multiple health behavior change in diet, exercise, and cigarette smoking. Female regular smokers (N = 315) randomized to 3 conditions received 16 weeks of behavioral smoking treatment, quit smoking at Week 5, and were followed for 9 months after quit date. Weight management was omitted for control and was added to the 1st 8 weeks for early diet (ED) and the final 8 weeks for late diet (LD). ED lacked lasting effect on weight gain, whereas LD initially lacked but gradually acquired a weight-suppression effect that stabilized (p = .004). Behavioral weight control did not undermine smoking cessation and, when initiated after the smoking quit date, slowed the rate of weight gain, supporting a sequential approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)785-796
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume72
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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