Reconstructing completely overlapped notes from musical mixtures

Jinyu Han*, Bryan A Pardo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

In mixtures of musical sounds, the problem of overlapped harmonics poses a significant challenge to source separation. Common Amplitude Modulation (CAM) is one of the most effective methods to resolve this problem. It, however, relies on non-overlapped harmonics from the same note being available. We propose an alternate technique for harmonic envelope estimation, based on Harmonic Temporal Envelope Similarity (HTES). We learn a harmonic envelope model for each instrument from the non-overlapped harmonics of notes of the same instrument, wherever they occur in the recording. This model is used to reconstruct the harmonic envelopes for overlapped harmonics. This allows reconstruction of completely overlapped notes. Experiments show our algorithm performs better than an existing system based on CAM when the harmonics of pitched instruments are strongly overlapped.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2011 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, ICASSP 2011 - Proceedings
Pages249-252
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 18 2011
Event36th IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, ICASSP 2011 - Prague, Czech Republic
Duration: May 22 2011May 27 2011

Publication series

NameICASSP, IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing - Proceedings
ISSN (Print)1520-6149

Other

Other36th IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, ICASSP 2011
CountryCzech Republic
CityPrague
Period5/22/115/27/11

Keywords

  • Common Amplitude Modulation
  • Harmonic Temporal Envelope Similarity
  • Music Source Separation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Signal Processing
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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