Recruiting participants with peripheral arterial disease for clinical trials: Experience from the Study to Improve Leg Circulation (SILC)

Mary M. McDermott*, Kathryn Domanchuk, Alan Dyer, Philip Ades, Melina Kibbe, Michael H. Criqui

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To describe the success of diverse recruitment methods in a randomized controlled clinical trial of exercise in persons with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Methods: An analysis of recruitment sources conducted for the 746 men and women completing a baseline visit for the study to improve leg circulation (SILC), a randomized controlled trial of exercise for patients with PAD. For each recruitment source, we determined the number of randomized participants, the rate of randomization among those completing a baseline visit, and cost per randomized participant. Results: Of the 746 individuals who completed a baseline visit, 156 were eligible and randomized. The most frequent sources of randomized participants were newspaper advertising (n = 67), mailed recruitment letters to patients with PAD identified at the study medical center (n = 25), and radio advertising (n = 18). Costs per randomized participant were $2750 for television advertising, $2167 for Life Line Screening, $2369 for newspaper advertising, $3931 for mailed postcards to older community dwelling men and women, and $5691 for radio advertising. Among those completing a baseline visit, randomization rates ranged from 10% for those identified from radio advertising to 32% for those identified from the Chicago Veterans Administration and 33% for those identified from posted flyers. Conclusion: Most participants in a randomized controlled trial of exercise were recruited from newspaper advertising and mailed recruitment letters to patients with known PAD. The highest randomization rates after a baseline visit occurred among participants identified from posted flyers and mailed recruitment letters to PAD patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)653-659.e4
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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