Redefining intimate partner violence: Women's experiences with physical violence and non-physical abuse by age

Nancy J. Mezey, Lori Ann Post, Christopher D. Maxwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between age, physical violence and non-physical abuse within the context of intimate partner violence (IPV). It tests the hypothesis that while the prevalence of physical violence is lower among older women, other forms of intimate partner violence are not related to age. The study uses data from the Michigan Violence Against Women Survey to measure physical violence and two forms of non-physical abuse: psychological vulnerability and autonomy-limiting behavior. Findings support the hypothesis that the rate of physical abuse is negatively related to age but the rate of nonphysical abuse is not. By expanding the definition of IPV to include other forms of abusive behavior, the study finds that older women have IPV prevalence rates similar to younger women. This raises the question of whether batterers alter their means of power and control by emphasizing non-physical abuse rather than continuing to use physical violence that exposes them to formal and informal social controls and sanctions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-154
Number of pages33
JournalInternational Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
Volume22
Issue number7-8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2002

Keywords

  • Intimate partner violence
  • Non-physical abuse
  • Psychological abuse
  • Violence by age

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

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