Redefining the disease locus of 16q22.1-linked autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia

Takeshi Amino, Kinya Ishikawa*, Shuta Toru, Taro Ishiguro, Nozomu Sato, Taiji Tsunemi, Miho Murata, Kazuhiro Kobayashi, Johji Inazawa, Tatsushi Toda, Hidehiro Mizusawa

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The 16q22.1-linked autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (16q-ADCA; Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [OMIN] #117210) is one of the most common ADCAs in Japan. Previously, we had reported that the patients share a common haplotype by founder effect and that a C-to-T substitution (-16C>T) in the puratrophin-1 gene was strongly associated with the disease. However, recently, an exceptional patient without the substitution was reported, indicating that a true pathogenic mutation might be present elsewhere. In this study, we clarified the disease locus more definitely by the haplotype analysis of families showing pure cerebellar ataxia. In addition to microsatellite markers, the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that we identified on the disease chromosome were examined to confirm the borders of the disease locus. The analysis of 64 families with the -16C>T substitution in the puratrophin-1 gene revealed one family showing an ancestral recombination event between SNP04 and SNP05 on the disease chromosome. The analysis of 22 families without identifiable genetic mutations revealed another family carrying the common haplotype centromeric to the puratrophin-1 gene, but lacking the -16C>T substitution in this gene. We concluded that the disease locus of 16q-ADCA was definitely confined to a 900-kb genomic region between the SNP04 and the -16C>T substitution in the puratrophin-1 gene in 16q22.1.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)643-649
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Human Genetics
Volume52
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007

Keywords

  • 16q-ADCA
  • Founder effect
  • Haplotype
  • Pure cerebellar ataxia
  • SCA4
  • SNP

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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