Reduced skeletal muscle satellite cell number alters muscle morphology after chronic stretch but allows limited serial sarcomere addition

Matthew C. Kinney, Sudarshan Dayanidhi, Peter B. Dykstra, John J. McCarthy, Charlotte A. Peterson, Richard L. Lieber*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Muscles add sarcomeres in response to stretch, presumably to maintain optimal sarcomere length. Clinical evidence from patients with cerebral palsy, who have both decreased serial sarcomere number and reduced satellite cells (SCs), suggests a hypothesis that SCs may be involved in sarcomere addition. Methods: A transgenic Pax7-DTA mouse model underwent conditional SC depletion, and their soleii were then stretch-immobilized to assess the capacity for sarcomere addition. Muscle architecture, morphology, and extracellular matrix (ECM) changes were also evaluated. Results: Mice in the SC-reduced group achieved normal serial sarcomere addition in response to stretch. However, muscle fiber cross-sectional area was significantly smaller and was associated with hypertrophic ECM changes, consistent with fibrosis. Conclusions: While a reduced SC population does not hinder serial sarcomere addition, SCs play a role in muscle adaptation to chronic stretch that involves maintenance of both fiber cross-sectional area and ECM structure. Muscle Nerve 55: 384–392, 2017.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)384-392
Number of pages9
JournalMuscle and Nerve
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Keywords

  • cerebral palsy
  • chronic stretch
  • fibrosis
  • sarcomere addition
  • satellite cells
  • skeletal muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Physiology (medical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Reduced skeletal muscle satellite cell number alters muscle morphology after chronic stretch but allows limited serial sarcomere addition'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this