Reduction of alcohol consumption by brief alcohol intervention in primary care: Systematic review and meta-analysis

Nicolas Bertholet, Jean Bernard Daeppen, Vincent Wietlisbach, Michael Fleming, Bernard Burnand*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

523 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Numerous trials of the efficacy of brief alcohol intervention have been conducted in various settings among individuals with a wide range of alcohol disorders. Nevertheless, the efficacy of the intervention is likely to be influenced by the context. We evaluated the evidence of efficacy of brief alcohol interventions aimed at reducing long-term alcohol use and related harm in individuals attending primary care facilities but not seeking help for alcohol-related problems. Method: We selected randomized trials reporting at least 1 outcome related to alcohol consumption conducted in outpatients who were actively attending primary care centers or seeing providers. Data sources were the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, ETOH database, and bibliographies of retrieved references and previous reviews. Study selection and data abstraction were performed independently and in duplicate. We assessed the validity of the studies and performed a meta-analysis of studies reporting alcohol consumption at 6 or 12 months of follow-up. Results: We examined 19 trials that included 5639 individuals. Seventeen trials reported a measure of alcohol consumption, of which 8 reported a significant effect of intervention. The adjusted intention-to-treat analysis showed a mean pooled difference of -38 g of ethanol (approximately 4 drinks) per week (95% confidence interval, -51 to -24g/wk) in favor of the brief alcohol intervention group. Evidence of other outcome measures was inconclusive. Conclusion: Focusing on patients in primary care, our systematic review and meta-analysis indicated that brief alcohol intervention is effective in reducing alcohol consumption at 6 and 12 months.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)986-995
Number of pages10
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume165
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 9 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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