Regional brain cholecystokinin changes as a function of friendly and aggressive social interactions in rats

Jaak Panksepp, Jeff Burgdorf, Margery C. Beinfeld, Roger A. Kroes, Joseph R. Moskal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cholecystokinin (CCK) is the most abundant neuropeptide in the mammalian brain, and has been implicated in the regulation of a diversity of emotions and motivations including negative affect and stress responses. In this experiment, we assayed levels of CCK (CCK4/5 and CCK8) from tissue homogenates in intruder animals 6 h after resident-intruder inter-male aggression. Intruder animals that demonstrated submissive behavior (freezing and 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations) had higher levels of CCK in the tegmentum and posterior cortex as compared to non-submissive (i.e., "Friendly") intruder animals. Ultrasonic vocalizations (22-kHz) were positively correlated with CCK levels in the tegmentum, posterior cortex and pituitary. These data suggest that CCK may play a role in the generation of negative affective states indexed by 22-kHz ultrasonic calls in certain regions of the brain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-84
Number of pages10
JournalBrain research
Volume1025
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 29 2004

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Cholecystokinin
  • Dominance
  • Neurochemistry
  • Rat
  • Social emotion
  • Social loss
  • Ultrasonic vocalization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Molecular Biology
  • General Neuroscience
  • Developmental Biology

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