Regulation of B-lymphocyte activation, proliferation, and immunoglobulin secretion

William E. Paul*, Junichiro Mizuguchi, Melissa Brown, Kenji Nakanishi, Peter Hornbeck, Evelyn Rabin, Junichi Ohara

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Lymphocyte growth and differentiation are controlled by signals resulting from the interaction of antigen and cellular products, such as lymphokines, with specific cell membrane receptors. Resting B lymphocytes can be activated by low concentrations (1-5 μg/ml) of antibodies to membrane IgM, which is the B-lymphocyte receptor for antigen. The binding of anti-IgM to B cells causes a rapid increase in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), in inositol phosphate concentration, and in protein kinase activity. Moreover, the effects of anti-IgM on B cells are mimicked by the combined use of calcium ionophores and phorbol esters. Since phorbol esters activate protein kinase c, this suggests that the increase in [Ca2+]i and in phosphatidylinositol metabolism stimulated by anti-IgM are critical events in B-cell activation. The entry into S phase of B cells stimulated with anti-IgM depends on the action of a T-cell-derived factor designated B-cell stimulatory factor (BSF)-1. This is a 20,000-Da protein which is a powerful inducer of class II major histocompatibility complex molecules. Although an important cofactor for B-cell proliferative responses to anti-IgM, its major locus of action is on resting B cells. B cells stimulated with anti-IgM and BSF-1 do not synthesize secretory IgM. However, if two additional T-cell-derived factors, B151-TRF and interleukin-2, are added to cultures, a substantial proportion of stimulated B cells produce secretory IgM. BSF-1 has also been shown to participate in the "switch" in Ig class expression. Resting B cells cultured with lipopolysaccharide will switch to IgG1 secretion in the presence of purified BSF-1.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7-13
Number of pages7
JournalCellular Immunology
Volume99
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 1986

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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