Relapsed or refractory pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Current and emerging treatments

Alissa Martin, Elaine R Morgan, Nobuko Hijiya*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatrics. With contemporary chemotherapy, >85 of patients with newly diagnosed ALL survive. Unfortunately, 20 of these patients will relapse and for these children, outcomes remain poor despite our best known chemotherapy protocols. Most of these children will achieve a second complete remission, but maintaining this remission remains difficult. Because relapsed ALL is such a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, it is the focus of much research interest. Efforts have been made and continue to focus on understanding the underlying biology that drives relapse. The role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in relapsed ALL remains unclear, but many clinicians still favor this for high-risk patients given the poor prognosis with current chemotherapy alone.It is important to use new drugs with little cross-resistance in the treatment of relapsed ALL. New classes of agents are currently being studied. We also discuss prognostic factors and the biology of relapsed ALL. Adis

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)377-387
Number of pages11
JournalPediatric Drugs
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 17 2012

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Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
Pediatrics
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics
Morbidity
Recurrence
Mortality
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Acute-lymphoblastic-leukaemia
  • Acute-myeloid-leukaemia
  • Anthracyclines
  • Antineoplastics
  • Asparaginase
  • Bortezomib
  • Children
  • Clofarabine
  • Cyclophosphamide
  • Cytarabine
  • Dasatinib
  • Doxorubicin
  • Etoposide
  • Glucocorticoids
  • Histone-deacetylase- inhibitors
  • Idarubicin
  • Ifosfamide
  • Mercaptopurine
  • Methotrexate
  • Methyltransferase-inhibitors
  • Mitoxantrone
  • Nelarabine
  • Nilotinib
  • Prednisone
  • Proteasome-inhibitors
  • Toll-like-receptor-9-agonists
  • Transplantation
  • Vinca-alkaloids
  • Vincristine
  • mTOR-protein-inhibitors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

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title = "Relapsed or refractory pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Current and emerging treatments",
abstract = "Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatrics. With contemporary chemotherapy, >85 of patients with newly diagnosed ALL survive. Unfortunately, 20 of these patients will relapse and for these children, outcomes remain poor despite our best known chemotherapy protocols. Most of these children will achieve a second complete remission, but maintaining this remission remains difficult. Because relapsed ALL is such a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, it is the focus of much research interest. Efforts have been made and continue to focus on understanding the underlying biology that drives relapse. The role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in relapsed ALL remains unclear, but many clinicians still favor this for high-risk patients given the poor prognosis with current chemotherapy alone.It is important to use new drugs with little cross-resistance in the treatment of relapsed ALL. New classes of agents are currently being studied. We also discuss prognostic factors and the biology of relapsed ALL. Adis",
keywords = "Acute-lymphoblastic-leukaemia, Acute-myeloid-leukaemia, Anthracyclines, Antineoplastics, Asparaginase, Bortezomib, Children, Clofarabine, Cyclophosphamide, Cytarabine, Dasatinib, Doxorubicin, Etoposide, Glucocorticoids, Histone-deacetylase- inhibitors, Idarubicin, Ifosfamide, Mercaptopurine, Methotrexate, Methyltransferase-inhibitors, Mitoxantrone, Nelarabine, Nilotinib, Prednisone, Proteasome-inhibitors, Toll-like-receptor-9-agonists, Transplantation, Vinca-alkaloids, Vincristine, mTOR-protein-inhibitors",
author = "Alissa Martin and Morgan, {Elaine R} and Nobuko Hijiya",
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language = "English (US)",
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}

Relapsed or refractory pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia : Current and emerging treatments. / Martin, Alissa; Morgan, Elaine R; Hijiya, Nobuko.

In: Pediatric Drugs, Vol. 14, No. 6, 17.10.2012, p. 377-387.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relapsed or refractory pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

T2 - Current and emerging treatments

AU - Martin, Alissa

AU - Morgan, Elaine R

AU - Hijiya, Nobuko

PY - 2012/10/17

Y1 - 2012/10/17

N2 - Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatrics. With contemporary chemotherapy, >85 of patients with newly diagnosed ALL survive. Unfortunately, 20 of these patients will relapse and for these children, outcomes remain poor despite our best known chemotherapy protocols. Most of these children will achieve a second complete remission, but maintaining this remission remains difficult. Because relapsed ALL is such a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, it is the focus of much research interest. Efforts have been made and continue to focus on understanding the underlying biology that drives relapse. The role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in relapsed ALL remains unclear, but many clinicians still favor this for high-risk patients given the poor prognosis with current chemotherapy alone.It is important to use new drugs with little cross-resistance in the treatment of relapsed ALL. New classes of agents are currently being studied. We also discuss prognostic factors and the biology of relapsed ALL. Adis

AB - Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatrics. With contemporary chemotherapy, >85 of patients with newly diagnosed ALL survive. Unfortunately, 20 of these patients will relapse and for these children, outcomes remain poor despite our best known chemotherapy protocols. Most of these children will achieve a second complete remission, but maintaining this remission remains difficult. Because relapsed ALL is such a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, it is the focus of much research interest. Efforts have been made and continue to focus on understanding the underlying biology that drives relapse. The role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in relapsed ALL remains unclear, but many clinicians still favor this for high-risk patients given the poor prognosis with current chemotherapy alone.It is important to use new drugs with little cross-resistance in the treatment of relapsed ALL. New classes of agents are currently being studied. We also discuss prognostic factors and the biology of relapsed ALL. Adis

KW - Acute-lymphoblastic-leukaemia

KW - Acute-myeloid-leukaemia

KW - Anthracyclines

KW - Antineoplastics

KW - Asparaginase

KW - Bortezomib

KW - Children

KW - Clofarabine

KW - Cyclophosphamide

KW - Cytarabine

KW - Dasatinib

KW - Doxorubicin

KW - Etoposide

KW - Glucocorticoids

KW - Histone-deacetylase- inhibitors

KW - Idarubicin

KW - Ifosfamide

KW - Mercaptopurine

KW - Methotrexate

KW - Methyltransferase-inhibitors

KW - Mitoxantrone

KW - Nelarabine

KW - Nilotinib

KW - Prednisone

KW - Proteasome-inhibitors

KW - Toll-like-receptor-9-agonists

KW - Transplantation

KW - Vinca-alkaloids

KW - Vincristine

KW - mTOR-protein-inhibitors

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DO - 10.2165/11598430

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VL - 14

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EP - 387

JO - Paediatric Drugs

JF - Paediatric Drugs

SN - 1174-5878

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