Relation of Ectopic Fat with Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk Score in South Asians Living in the United States (from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America [MASALA] Study)

Morgana Mongraw-Chaffin, Unjali P. Gujral, Alka M. Kanaya, Namratha R Kandula, John Jeffrey Carr, Cheryl A.M. Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Few studies have investigated the association between ectopic fat from different depots and cardiovascular risk scores and their components in the same population, and none have investigated these relations in South Asians. In a cross-sectional analysis of 796 participants in the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study who had measurements of visceral, subcutaneous, pericardial, hepatic, and intermuscular fat from abdominal and cardiac computed tomography scans, we used linear regression to determine the associations of 1 standard deviation difference in each ectopic fat depot with pooled cohort risk score and its components. Pericardial and visceral fat were more strongly associated with the pooled cohort risk score (3.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5 to 3.7, and 2.7%, 95% CI 2.1 to 3.3, respectively) and components than intermuscular fat (2.3%, 95% CI 1.7 to 3.0); subcutaneous fat was inversely associated with the pooled cohort risk score (−2.6%, 95% CI −3.2 to 1.9) and hepatic fat attenuation was not linearly associated with the pooled cohort risk score when mutually adjusted (−0.3%, 95% CI −0.9 to 0.4). Associations for risk factor components differed by fat depot. In conclusion, subcutaneous and hepatic fat may have different functions than fat stored in other depots in South Asians. Determining whether these relations are heterogeneous by race may help elucidate the mechanisms underlying CVD disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)315-321
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume121
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

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Atherosclerosis
Cardiovascular Diseases
Fats
Confidence Intervals
Subcutaneous Fat
Liver
Race Relations
Abdominal Fat
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Linear Models
Cross-Sectional Studies
Tomography
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{44c192ab957c410887df178ce12231f6,
title = "Relation of Ectopic Fat with Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk Score in South Asians Living in the United States (from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America [MASALA] Study)",
abstract = "Few studies have investigated the association between ectopic fat from different depots and cardiovascular risk scores and their components in the same population, and none have investigated these relations in South Asians. In a cross-sectional analysis of 796 participants in the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study who had measurements of visceral, subcutaneous, pericardial, hepatic, and intermuscular fat from abdominal and cardiac computed tomography scans, we used linear regression to determine the associations of 1 standard deviation difference in each ectopic fat depot with pooled cohort risk score and its components. Pericardial and visceral fat were more strongly associated with the pooled cohort risk score (3.1{\%}, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 2.5 to 3.7, and 2.7{\%}, 95{\%} CI 2.1 to 3.3, respectively) and components than intermuscular fat (2.3{\%}, 95{\%} CI 1.7 to 3.0); subcutaneous fat was inversely associated with the pooled cohort risk score (−2.6{\%}, 95{\%} CI −3.2 to 1.9) and hepatic fat attenuation was not linearly associated with the pooled cohort risk score when mutually adjusted (−0.3{\%}, 95{\%} CI −0.9 to 0.4). Associations for risk factor components differed by fat depot. In conclusion, subcutaneous and hepatic fat may have different functions than fat stored in other depots in South Asians. Determining whether these relations are heterogeneous by race may help elucidate the mechanisms underlying CVD disparities.",
author = "Morgana Mongraw-Chaffin and Gujral, {Unjali P.} and Kanaya, {Alka M.} and Kandula, {Namratha R} and Carr, {John Jeffrey} and Anderson, {Cheryl A.M.}",
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Relation of Ectopic Fat with Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk Score in South Asians Living in the United States (from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America [MASALA] Study). / Mongraw-Chaffin, Morgana; Gujral, Unjali P.; Kanaya, Alka M.; Kandula, Namratha R; Carr, John Jeffrey; Anderson, Cheryl A.M.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 121, No. 3, 01.02.2018, p. 315-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Mongraw-Chaffin, Morgana

AU - Gujral, Unjali P.

AU - Kanaya, Alka M.

AU - Kandula, Namratha R

AU - Carr, John Jeffrey

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