Relation of traditional risk factors to intrauterine growth retardation among United States-born and foreign-born Mexican Americans in Chicago

James W. Collins*, Camilia R. Martin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the relation of traditional sociodemographic characteristics to the small-for-gestational age rates of urban Mexican Americans. Design: A cross-sectional study. Methods: We performed a stratified analysis of 1982-1983 Illinois vital records and 1980 U.S. Census income data. The authors analyzed the 1982-1983 Illinois vital records and 1980 U.S. Census income data to determine whether maternal sociodemographic characteristics are associated with the small-for-gestational age (weight-for-gestational length < 10th percentile) rates among Mexican Americans in Chicago. Results: The small-for-gestational age rate was 2.1% for infants with U.S.-born mothers (N=2,253) compared to 1.4% for infants with foreign-born mothers (N = 8,746); relative risk 1.5 (95% confidence interval 1.1-2.1). For the U.S.-born cohort, maternal education, marital status, parity, prenatal care, and community income were associated with small-for-gestational age rates. In contrast, with the exception of marital status, these commonly cited risk factors were not associated with the small-for-gestational age rates of infants with Mexican-born mothers. The U.S.-born:Mexico-born small-for-gestational age rate ratio fluctuated around 2 among mothers with a high-risk (maternal age < 20 years, < 12 years education, unmarried marital status) demographic profile. Conclusions: We conclude that traditional sociodemographic risk factors have different reproductive outcome consequences for U.S.-born and foreign-born Mexican-American mothers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-25
Number of pages5
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume8
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 1 1998

Keywords

  • Intrauterine Growth Retardation
  • Mexican American
  • Nativity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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