Relationship between changes in dietary sucrose and high density lipoprotein cholesterol: The CARDIA study

Sujata L. Archer*, Kiang Liu, Alan R. Dyer, Karen J. Ruth, David R. Jacobs, Linda Van Horn, Joan E. Hilner, Peter J. Savage

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

PURPOSE: Cross-sectional data from several observational studies have suggested that dietary sucrose may be inversely associated with high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). This study examined associations between energy from dietary sucrose and HDL-C at baseline, year 7 and longitudinally (year 7 minus baseline) in a cohort of young black and white men and women from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. METHODS: The sample included 4734 black men, black women, white men and white women, ages 18-30 years, in 1985-86 (baseline); 3513 at year 7; and 3335 for longitudinal analyses. Multivariate analyses was used with adjustment for age, BMI, cigarettes smoked per day, physical activity score, and alcohol intake. RESULTS: Multivariate analyses indicated that energy intake from sucrose was inversely associated with HDL-C for each race-gender group at baseline, year 7, and longitudinally from baseline to year 7. This association was significant at baseline for black men, and white men and women (p < 0.01); at year 7 for white men and black women (p < 0.01), and longitudinally for white men, white women, and black women (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The consistent inverse associations between energy from dietary sucrose and HDL-C observed in both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, and in different race and gender groups in CARDIA suggest that lowering dietary sucrose intake may be beneficial for those who may have low HDL-C.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)433-438
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Epidemiology
Volume8
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1998

Keywords

  • High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol
  • Sucrose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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