Relationship between manometric and videofluoroscopic measures of swallow function in healthy adults and patients treated for head and neck cancer with various modalities

Barbara Roa Pauloski, Alfred W. Rademaker, Cathy Lazarus, Guy Boeckxstaens, Peter J. Kahrilas, Jerilyn A. Logemann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Pharyngeal manometry complements the modified barium swallow with videofluoroscopy (VFS) in diagnosing pressure-related causes of dysphagia. When manometric analysis is not feasible, it would be ideal if pressure information about the swallow could be inferred accurately from the VFS evaluation. Swallowing function was examined using VFS and concurrent manometry in 18 subjects (11 head and neck patients treated with various modalities and 7 healthy adults). Nonparametric univariate and multivariate analyses revealed significant relationships between manometric and fluoroscopic variables. Increases in pressure wave amplitude were significantly correlated with increased duration of tongue base to pharyngeal wall contact, reduced bolus transit times, and oropharyngeal residue. Pharyngeal residue was the most important VFS variable in reflecting pharyngeal pressure measurements. Certain VFS measures were significantly correlated with measures of pressure assessed with manometry. Further research is needed before observations and measures from VFS alone may be deemed sufficient for determining pressure-generation difficulties during the swallow in patients who are unable or unwilling to submit to manometric testing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)196-203
Number of pages8
JournalDysphagia
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Correlation
  • Deglutition
  • Deglutition disorders
  • Manometry
  • Videofluoroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Speech and Hearing

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