Relationship between physician-adjudicated adverse events and patient-reported health-related quality of life in a phase II clinical trial (NCT01143402) of patients with metastatic uveal melanoma

Thomas M. Atkinson*, Jennifer L. Hay, Alexander Shoushtari, Yuelin Li, Daniel J. Paucar, Sloane C. Smith, Ragini R. Kudchadkar, Austin Doyle, Jeffrey A. Sosman, Jorge Fernando Quevedo, Mohammed M. Milhem, Anthony M. Joshua, Gerald P. Linette, Thomas F. Gajewski, Jose Lutzky, David H. Lawson, Christopher D. Lao, Patrick J. Flynn, Mark R. Albertini, Takami SatoKarl Lewis, Brian Marr, David H. Abramson, Mark Andrew Dickson, Gary K. Schwartz, Richard D. Carvajal

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Clinical trials commonly use physician-adjudicated adverse event (AE) assessment via the common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) for decision-making. Patient-reported health-related quality of life (HRQoL) data are becoming more frequent in oncology; however, the relationship between physician-adjudicated AE assessment and HRQoL is understudied. Methods: Data from a phase II trial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01143402) where patients with metastatic uveal melanoma were randomized to receive selumetinib, an oral MEK inhibitor, or chemotherapy were analyzed. Patients reported HRQoL at baseline, after 1 month, and end of treatment (n = 118), whereas physicians adjudicated AEs via CTCAE. Mean HRQoL scores were compared between patient randomization arms, as well as between those patients who did/did not receive dose modifications. Results: Ninety-four percent had a CTCAE grade ≥1 for at least one treatment-associated AE, with 18% undergoing dose modification due to toxicity. Mean HRQoL scores did not significantly differ at each of the three time points. Patient and physician-adjudicated reports of nausea were significantly correlated at the start (r = 0.31, p < 0.01) and end of treatment (r = 0.42, p < 0.05). There were no significant correlations between need for dose modification and HRQoL scores. Conclusions: Despite the high rate of physician-adjudicated AEs and need for dose modifications with selumetinib, patient-reported HRQoL was not impacted by treatment. Since HRQoL did not differ in the subgroup of patients who received dosage reductions due to AEs, patients may be willing to tolerate select AEs without dose modification (if medically appropriate). More research is needed to determine how to best integrate HRQoL data into clinical trial conduct.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)439-445
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology
Volume143
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Keywords

  • Adverse events
  • Clinical trials
  • Neoplasms
  • Patient-reported outcomes
  • Quality of life
  • Selumetinib
  • Uveal melanoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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