Relationship Education in Community Settings: Effectiveness with Distressed and Non-Distressed Low-Income Racial Minority Couples

Kelley Quirk*, Johanna Strokoff, Jesse J. Owen, Tiffany France, Carrie Bergen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Couple relationship education (CRE) programs are intended to prevent negative couple outcomes, however, some evidence suggests couples in greater distress may still benefit. The current study examined pre- and postchanges in relationship functioning of 362 low-income African American and Hispanic couples. Outcomes (dedication and communication) were assessed by examining differences between two distinct groupings of couples; distressed (both partners reporting clinically significant distress) and nondistressed (neither partner reporting clinically significant distress) couples. Distressed couples at predemonstrated large-sized gains in all outcome variables, as compared to nondistressed couples. Those who participated in the single-couple format demonstrated lower gains in positive communication as compared to those in the group format. Implications for distressed couples in CRE programs are offered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)442-453
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Marital and Family Therapy
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

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