Relationships between interleukin-6 activity, acute phase proteins, and function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in severe depression

Michael Maes*, Simon Scharpé, Herbert Y. Meltzer, Eugène Bosmans, Eduard Suy, Joseph Calabrese, Paul Cosyns

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

349 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent studies from this laboratory have provided some evidence that major depression, in particular melancholia, may be accompanied by an immune response. The present study was designed to investigate whether severe depression is characterized by increased interleukin-6 (Il-6) activity and whether Il-6 production is related to altered levels of acute phase reactants and to abnormal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Measurements were made in 8 healthy control subjects and 24 depressed inpatients of Il-6 production in culture supernatants of mitogen-stimulated peripheral leukocytes and plasma levels of haptoglobin (Hp), transferrin (Tf), and postdexamethasone cortisol. Il-6 activity was significantly higher in melancholic subjects than in healthy control subjects and in patients with minor depression or nonmelancholic major depression. Il-6 production was significantly correlated with Hp (positively) and Tf (negatively) plasma levels. There were significant and positive correlations between Il-6 activity and postdexamethasone cortisol values. The findings may suggest that increased Il-6 activity in severe depression is related to hypotransferrinemia, hyperhaptoglobinemia, and hyperactivity of the HPA axis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-27
Number of pages17
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1993

Keywords

  • Depression
  • dexamethasone suppression test
  • haptoglobin
  • immunology
  • interleukins
  • transferrin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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