Religion in the public sphere: Remarks on Habermas’s conception of public deliberation in postsecular societies

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter focuses on Jurgen Habermas’s essay “Religion in the Public Sphere”. In order to evaluate the plausibility of his account, it summarizes the basic features of the liberal view of the ethics of citizenship central to Habermas’s discussion. The chapter also summarizes the objections of Nicholas Wolterstorff and Paul Weithman that Habermas finds compelling and begin to explain his alternative proposal designed to avoid them. In his essay, Habermas points out that the liberal conception of democratic citizenship is based on the assumption that “natural reason” is sufficient to discover the moral and political obligations. According to Habermas, the most serious objection that authors such as Wolterstorff and Weithman have articulated against John Rawls’s account of the ethics of citizenship is that the obligation to provide publicly accessible reasons for political decisions imposes an undue cognitive burden on religious citizens, threatening the integrity of their religious existence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHabermas and Law
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages277-297
Number of pages21
ISBN (Electronic)9781000108910
ISBN (Print)9781472428639
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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