Renal angina index predicts fluid overload in critically ill children: an observational cohort study

Stephen M. Gorga*, Erin F. Carlton, Joseph G. Kohne, Ryan P. Barbaro, Rajit K. Basu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Fluid overload and acute kidney injury are common and associated with poor outcomes among critically ill children. The prodrome of renal angina stratifies patients by risk for severe acute kidney injury, but the predictive discrimination for fluid overload is unknown. Methods: Post-hoc analysis of patients admitted to a tertiary care pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). The primary outcome was the performance of renal angina fulfillment on day of ICU admission to predict fluid overload ≥15% on Day 3. Results: 77/139 children (55%) fulfilled renal angina (RA+). After adjusting for covariates, RA+ was associated with increased odds of fluid overload on Day 3 (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 5.1, 95% CI 1.23–21.2, p = 0.025, versus RA-). RA- resulted in a 90% negative predictive value for fluid overload on Day 3. Median fluid overload was significantly higher in RA+ patients with severe acute kidney injury compared to RA+ patients without severe acute kidney injury (% fluid overload on Day 3: 8.8% vs. 0.73%, p = 0.002). Conclusion: Among critically ill children, fulfillment of renal angina was associated with increased odds of fluid overload versus the absence of renal angina and a higher fluid overload among patients who developed acute kidney injury. Renal angina directed risk classification may identify patients at highest risk for fluid accumulation. Expanded study in larger populations is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number336
JournalBMC nephrology
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Acute kidney injury
  • Fluid overload
  • Kidney disease: improving global outcomes
  • Renal angina index

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

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