Renal dysfunction following autologous bone marrow transplantation in adult patients with acute leukemia

Paul Glynne, Ray Powles, Jeremy Steele, Seema Singhal, Jennifer Treleaven, Diana Tait, Jayesh Mehta*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The serum creatinine level was used to determine the incidence of renal dysfunction in 70 adults with acute leukemia who were alive and web one year following autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). Creatinine measurements at the time of ABMT, one year post-ABMT and at the last follow-up (12-128 months, median 35) were recorded, and a level of >120 μmol/l arbitrarily defined as clinically significant renal impairment. The incidence of renal impairment was 2.9% (n = 2) at 1 year, and 4.3% (n = 3) at the last follow-up in continuous remission. Significant renal impairment occurred after relapse in 8 of 12 patients, but was seen in only 3 of 58 patients who remained in remission (p < 0.001, Fisher's exact test), suggesting subclinical renal damage which became obvious with further nephrotoxic therapy. We conclude that clinically significant renal dysfunction is an uncommon long-term complication of ABMT, and should not be a concern in recommending this therapy to eligible patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)709-712
Number of pages4
JournalActa Oncologica
Volume35
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Renal dysfunction following autologous bone marrow transplantation in adult patients with acute leukemia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this