Repeat cesarean section and primary elective cesarean section: Recently trained obstetrician-gynecologist practice patterns and opinions

Kimberly Kenton*, Cynthia Brincat, Martina Mutone, Linda Brubaker, David Lewis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This study was undertaken to determine opinions of obstetrician-gynecologists regarding vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) section and elective cesarean section. Study design: A questionnaire was administered to obstetrician-gynecologists attending 2 review courses. Results: Of 500 obstetrician-gynecologists, 304 completed the survey for a response rate of 61%. Most (92%) counseled VBAC candidates differently, and 84% quoted differential VBAC completion rates on the basis of the indication for prior cesarean section. Uterine rupture was virtually always discussed (99%). Pelvic floor risks were infrequently discussed with urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and fecal incontinence discussed by less than one third of obstetricians (30%, 28%, and 25%, respectively). Fifty-nine percent of physicians would perform a primary elective cesarean section, and 67% would perform a primary elective cesarean section specifically to prevent pelvic floor disorders. Conclusion: Two thirds of recent graduates are willing to perform an elective cesarean section to prevent pelvic floor injury. Most offer VBAC; however, less than a third include risk of pelvic floor injury in their informed consent discussions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1872-1875
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume192
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

Keywords

  • Cesarean section
  • Incontinence
  • Pelvic floor
  • Vaginal birth
  • Vaginal birth after cesarean section

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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