Resection of a retropharyngeal craniovertebral junction chordoma through a posterior cervical approach

Gregory S. McLoughlin, Daniel M. Sciubba, Ian Suk, Ali Bydon, Timothy Witham, Jean Paul Wolinsky, Ziya L. Gokaslan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study Desigh: This illustrative case report is designed to provide technical data regarding the use of a posterior approach to resect a retropharyngeal chordoma involving the craniovertebral junction. objective: The objective of this report is to emphasize the utility of the posterior approach when treating anterior tumors of the craniovertebral junction. summary of background data: Traditionally, a transoral transpharyngeal or extended anterior approach was used to resect anterior tumors of the craniovertebral junction. These approaches have several limitations unique to these exposures, limitations not applicable to a posterior midline cervical approach. methods: A case report is provided that illustrates the use of a posterior cervical approach used to resect a retropharyngeal craniovertebral junction chordoma. results: Gross total resection of a retropharyngeal chordoma was achieved using a posterior cervical approach. Although local tumor recurrence did occur, this was resected and adjuvant radiotherapy prescribed. This resulted in an ongoing 4-year recurrence free survival. conclusions: The posterior cervical midline exposure could be used to dissect and remove anterior retropharyngeal tumors, with minimal morbidity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)359-365
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2010

Keywords

  • chordoma
  • craniovertebral junction
  • surgical approach
  • tumor resection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

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