Resident perceptions of 2-year versus 3-year cardiothoracic training programs

Tom C. Nguyen*, Matthew D. Terwelp, Elizabeth H. Stephens, David D. Odell, Gabriel Loor, Damien J. Lapar, Walter F. Denino, Benjamin Wei, Muhammad Aftab, Ryan A. Macke, Jennifer S. Nelson, Kathleen S. Berfield, John F. Lazar, William Stein, Samuel J. Youssef, Vakhtang Tchantchaleishvili

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Resident perceptions of 2-year (2Y) vs 3-year (3Y) programs have never been characterized. The objective was to use the mandatory Thoracic Surgery Residents Association and Thoracic Surgery Directors Association In-Training Examination survey to compare perceptions of residents graduating from 2Y vs 3Y cardiothoracic programs. Methods Each year Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education cardiothoracic residents are required to take a 30-question survey designed by the Thoracic Surgery Residents Association and the Thoracic Surgery Directors Association accompanying the In-Training Examination with a 100% response rate. The 2013 and 2014 survey responses of residents graduating from 2Y vs 3Y training programs were compared. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to analyze ordinal and interval data. Results Graduating residents completed 167 surveys, including 96 from 2Y (56%) and 71 from 3Y (43%) programs. There was no difference in the perception of being prepared for the American Board of Thoracic Surgery examinations or amount of debt between 2Y and 3Y respondents. There was no difference in intended academic vs private practice. Graduating 3Y residents felt more prepared to meet case requirements and better trained, were more likely to pass their written American Board of Thoracic Surgery examinations, and were less likely to pursue additional training beyond their cardiothoracic residency. Conclusions There was no difference in field of interest, practice type, and amount of debt between graduating 2Y vs 3Y residents. Respondents from 2Y programs expressed more difficulty in meeting case requirements, whereas residents from 3Y programs felt more prepared for independent practice and had higher American Board of Thoracic Surgery written pass rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2070-2076
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume99
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Thoracic Surgery
Education
Graduate Medical Education
Accreditation
Private Practice
Internship and Residency
Nonparametric Statistics
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Nguyen, T. C., Terwelp, M. D., Stephens, E. H., Odell, D. D., Loor, G., Lapar, D. J., ... Tchantchaleishvili, V. (2015). Resident perceptions of 2-year versus 3-year cardiothoracic training programs. Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 99(6), 2070-2076. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2015.01.031
Nguyen, Tom C. ; Terwelp, Matthew D. ; Stephens, Elizabeth H. ; Odell, David D. ; Loor, Gabriel ; Lapar, Damien J. ; Denino, Walter F. ; Wei, Benjamin ; Aftab, Muhammad ; Macke, Ryan A. ; Nelson, Jennifer S. ; Berfield, Kathleen S. ; Lazar, John F. ; Stein, William ; Youssef, Samuel J. ; Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang. / Resident perceptions of 2-year versus 3-year cardiothoracic training programs. In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 2015 ; Vol. 99, No. 6. pp. 2070-2076.
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abstract = "Background Resident perceptions of 2-year (2Y) vs 3-year (3Y) programs have never been characterized. The objective was to use the mandatory Thoracic Surgery Residents Association and Thoracic Surgery Directors Association In-Training Examination survey to compare perceptions of residents graduating from 2Y vs 3Y cardiothoracic programs. Methods Each year Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education cardiothoracic residents are required to take a 30-question survey designed by the Thoracic Surgery Residents Association and the Thoracic Surgery Directors Association accompanying the In-Training Examination with a 100{\%} response rate. The 2013 and 2014 survey responses of residents graduating from 2Y vs 3Y training programs were compared. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to analyze ordinal and interval data. Results Graduating residents completed 167 surveys, including 96 from 2Y (56{\%}) and 71 from 3Y (43{\%}) programs. There was no difference in the perception of being prepared for the American Board of Thoracic Surgery examinations or amount of debt between 2Y and 3Y respondents. There was no difference in intended academic vs private practice. Graduating 3Y residents felt more prepared to meet case requirements and better trained, were more likely to pass their written American Board of Thoracic Surgery examinations, and were less likely to pursue additional training beyond their cardiothoracic residency. Conclusions There was no difference in field of interest, practice type, and amount of debt between graduating 2Y vs 3Y residents. Respondents from 2Y programs expressed more difficulty in meeting case requirements, whereas residents from 3Y programs felt more prepared for independent practice and had higher American Board of Thoracic Surgery written pass rates.",
author = "Nguyen, {Tom C.} and Terwelp, {Matthew D.} and Stephens, {Elizabeth H.} and Odell, {David D.} and Gabriel Loor and Lapar, {Damien J.} and Denino, {Walter F.} and Benjamin Wei and Muhammad Aftab and Macke, {Ryan A.} and Nelson, {Jennifer S.} and Berfield, {Kathleen S.} and Lazar, {John F.} and William Stein and Youssef, {Samuel J.} and Vakhtang Tchantchaleishvili",
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Nguyen, TC, Terwelp, MD, Stephens, EH, Odell, DD, Loor, G, Lapar, DJ, Denino, WF, Wei, B, Aftab, M, Macke, RA, Nelson, JS, Berfield, KS, Lazar, JF, Stein, W, Youssef, SJ & Tchantchaleishvili, V 2015, 'Resident perceptions of 2-year versus 3-year cardiothoracic training programs', Annals of Thoracic Surgery, vol. 99, no. 6, pp. 2070-2076. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2015.01.031

Resident perceptions of 2-year versus 3-year cardiothoracic training programs. / Nguyen, Tom C.; Terwelp, Matthew D.; Stephens, Elizabeth H.; Odell, David D.; Loor, Gabriel; Lapar, Damien J.; Denino, Walter F.; Wei, Benjamin; Aftab, Muhammad; Macke, Ryan A.; Nelson, Jennifer S.; Berfield, Kathleen S.; Lazar, John F.; Stein, William; Youssef, Samuel J.; Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang.

In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 99, No. 6, 01.01.2015, p. 2070-2076.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Resident perceptions of 2-year versus 3-year cardiothoracic training programs

AU - Nguyen, Tom C.

AU - Terwelp, Matthew D.

AU - Stephens, Elizabeth H.

AU - Odell, David D.

AU - Loor, Gabriel

AU - Lapar, Damien J.

AU - Denino, Walter F.

AU - Wei, Benjamin

AU - Aftab, Muhammad

AU - Macke, Ryan A.

AU - Nelson, Jennifer S.

AU - Berfield, Kathleen S.

AU - Lazar, John F.

AU - Stein, William

AU - Youssef, Samuel J.

AU - Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Background Resident perceptions of 2-year (2Y) vs 3-year (3Y) programs have never been characterized. The objective was to use the mandatory Thoracic Surgery Residents Association and Thoracic Surgery Directors Association In-Training Examination survey to compare perceptions of residents graduating from 2Y vs 3Y cardiothoracic programs. Methods Each year Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education cardiothoracic residents are required to take a 30-question survey designed by the Thoracic Surgery Residents Association and the Thoracic Surgery Directors Association accompanying the In-Training Examination with a 100% response rate. The 2013 and 2014 survey responses of residents graduating from 2Y vs 3Y training programs were compared. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to analyze ordinal and interval data. Results Graduating residents completed 167 surveys, including 96 from 2Y (56%) and 71 from 3Y (43%) programs. There was no difference in the perception of being prepared for the American Board of Thoracic Surgery examinations or amount of debt between 2Y and 3Y respondents. There was no difference in intended academic vs private practice. Graduating 3Y residents felt more prepared to meet case requirements and better trained, were more likely to pass their written American Board of Thoracic Surgery examinations, and were less likely to pursue additional training beyond their cardiothoracic residency. Conclusions There was no difference in field of interest, practice type, and amount of debt between graduating 2Y vs 3Y residents. Respondents from 2Y programs expressed more difficulty in meeting case requirements, whereas residents from 3Y programs felt more prepared for independent practice and had higher American Board of Thoracic Surgery written pass rates.

AB - Background Resident perceptions of 2-year (2Y) vs 3-year (3Y) programs have never been characterized. The objective was to use the mandatory Thoracic Surgery Residents Association and Thoracic Surgery Directors Association In-Training Examination survey to compare perceptions of residents graduating from 2Y vs 3Y cardiothoracic programs. Methods Each year Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education cardiothoracic residents are required to take a 30-question survey designed by the Thoracic Surgery Residents Association and the Thoracic Surgery Directors Association accompanying the In-Training Examination with a 100% response rate. The 2013 and 2014 survey responses of residents graduating from 2Y vs 3Y training programs were compared. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to analyze ordinal and interval data. Results Graduating residents completed 167 surveys, including 96 from 2Y (56%) and 71 from 3Y (43%) programs. There was no difference in the perception of being prepared for the American Board of Thoracic Surgery examinations or amount of debt between 2Y and 3Y respondents. There was no difference in intended academic vs private practice. Graduating 3Y residents felt more prepared to meet case requirements and better trained, were more likely to pass their written American Board of Thoracic Surgery examinations, and were less likely to pursue additional training beyond their cardiothoracic residency. Conclusions There was no difference in field of interest, practice type, and amount of debt between graduating 2Y vs 3Y residents. Respondents from 2Y programs expressed more difficulty in meeting case requirements, whereas residents from 3Y programs felt more prepared for independent practice and had higher American Board of Thoracic Surgery written pass rates.

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