Residents' perspectives on violence and personal safety in the emergency department

Deirdre Anglin*, Demetrios N. Kyriacou, H. Range Hutson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study objective: To assess emergency medicine residents' perspectives on violence and personal safety in the emergency department. Design and participants: Survey of all 461 current emergency medicine residents and 1992 graduates in the 13 emergency medicine residency programs in California. Results: Eighty-five percent of residents responded to the survey questionnaire. Sixty-two percent of respondents worry about their own safety while working in the ED. The majority of these respondents (72%), however, most fear a needlestick injury from an HIV-positive patient. Fifty percent of the respondents believe that their hospital/residency programs do not provide adequate security in the ED. Respondents overwhelmingly favor some form of gun control legislation. Conclusion: Violence and personal safety in the ED are major concerns of emergency medicine residents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1082-1084
Number of pages3
JournalAnnals of Emergency Medicine
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

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