Respiratory dysfunction following initiation of mirabegron

A case report

Elizabeth S. Malsin*, John Martin Coleman III, Lisa F Wolfe, Anna P Lam

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Mirabegron, a β3 adrenergic receptor agonist, is FDA approved for treatment of overactive bladder. Approved in 2012 in the US, there have been no reports of any effects of mirabegron on pulmonary function. Case presentation: We report the case of a 65 year old male with a history of Parkinson's disease, OSA, and aspiration pneumonia presenting with subacute worsening dyspnea and found to have worsening restrictive ventilatory defect with a pattern consistent with neuromuscular weakness. After recalling that initiation of mirabegron correlated with onset of his worsening symptoms, the patient decided to perform a trial period off the drug. He subsequently reported prompt improvement in his respiratory symptoms, which was confirmed objectively by pulmonary function tests. In this case, mirabegron was temporally associated with subacute worsening of the patient's pulmonary restrictive physiology, with subsequent resolution after discontinuation of the medication. Conclusions: The mechanism of this adverse effect is unknown, but we speculate that this effect may be potentially mediated by the effect of β3 adrenergic receptor agonism on skeletal muscle, in this case in a patient with pre-existing neuromuscular disease. Careful assessment of patients who develop shortness of breath while on mirabegron should include an assessment for restrictive lung disease secondary neuromuscular dysfunction. Additional study is needed of the effects of β3 agonism on skeletal muscle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)304-306
Number of pages3
JournalRespiratory Medicine Case Reports
Volume26
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Dyspnea
Skeletal Muscle
Aspiration Pneumonia
Overactive Urinary Bladder
Lung
Adrenergic Agonists
Neuromuscular Diseases
Preexisting Condition Coverage
Respiratory Function Tests
Adrenergic Receptors
Lung Diseases
Parkinson Disease
mirabegron
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Adverse medication effect
  • Neuromuscular lung disease
  • β3 receptor agonist therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Respiratory dysfunction following initiation of mirabegron: A case report",
abstract = "Background: Mirabegron, a β3 adrenergic receptor agonist, is FDA approved for treatment of overactive bladder. Approved in 2012 in the US, there have been no reports of any effects of mirabegron on pulmonary function. Case presentation: We report the case of a 65 year old male with a history of Parkinson's disease, OSA, and aspiration pneumonia presenting with subacute worsening dyspnea and found to have worsening restrictive ventilatory defect with a pattern consistent with neuromuscular weakness. After recalling that initiation of mirabegron correlated with onset of his worsening symptoms, the patient decided to perform a trial period off the drug. He subsequently reported prompt improvement in his respiratory symptoms, which was confirmed objectively by pulmonary function tests. In this case, mirabegron was temporally associated with subacute worsening of the patient's pulmonary restrictive physiology, with subsequent resolution after discontinuation of the medication. Conclusions: The mechanism of this adverse effect is unknown, but we speculate that this effect may be potentially mediated by the effect of β3 adrenergic receptor agonism on skeletal muscle, in this case in a patient with pre-existing neuromuscular disease. Careful assessment of patients who develop shortness of breath while on mirabegron should include an assessment for restrictive lung disease secondary neuromuscular dysfunction. Additional study is needed of the effects of β3 agonism on skeletal muscle.",
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Respiratory dysfunction following initiation of mirabegron : A case report. / Malsin, Elizabeth S.; Coleman III, John Martin; Wolfe, Lisa F; Lam, Anna P.

In: Respiratory Medicine Case Reports, Vol. 26, 01.01.2019, p. 304-306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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