Response to induction chemotherapy is not essential to obtain survival benefit from high-dose melphalan and autotransplantation in myeloma

S. Singhal*, R. Powles, B. Sirohi, J. Treleaven, S. Kulkarni, J. Mehta

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

77 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two hundred and twenty-two myeloma patients autografted after 200 mg/m2 melphalan were studied to examine the relationship between response to induction chemotherapy and outcome. Induction comprised cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin and methylprednisolone (C-VAMP) every 3 weeks for one cycle beyond maximum response. 81% responded to C-VAMP (chemosensitive) with 40 complete (CR) and 139 partial (PR) remissions, and 43 did not respond (NR; <50% reduction in paraprotein; primary refractory). Overall, 130 patients (59%) attained or remained in CR post-transplant; including 40% of NR, 53% of PR, and 97% of CR after C-VAMP (P < 0.0001). Amongst these 130 patients, the 5-year OS was independent of response to C-VAMP (NR 79%, PR 74%, CR 60%; P = 0.69). Similarly, among the 69 patients in PR post-transplant, the 5-year OS was independent of response to C-VAMP. In Cox analysis, lack of response to C-VAMP did not affect outcome significantly. These data show that lack of response to induction therapy does not automatically predict poor long-term outcome in myeloma, since a substantial proportion of these patients attain CR after autograft and enjoy extended survival. Myeloma patients should not be disqualified from an autograft based upon lack of response to induction chemotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)673-679
Number of pages7
JournalBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume30
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2002

Keywords

  • Autotransplantation
  • Chemosensitivity
  • High-dose melphalan
  • Multiple myeloma
  • Primary refractory disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Hematology

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